What could be $100 million for you – except for Kentucky campaign ads?

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What could be $100 million for you – except for Kentucky campaign ads?

For the amount of money spent on the U.S. senate race this year in Kentucky, you can buy a bottle of the state’s own Maker’s Mark for almost every man, woman and child in the state.

Some observers say the election could be the most competitive in the history of the senate, spending as much as $100 million. Why not? It is at the heart of the struggle to control the U.S. senate.

Mitch McConnell is the top republican in the senate and is likely to become majority leader. It turned out that he was not so popular in his hometown, which created an opening for the democratic secretary of state in Kentucky, Alison redganger.

Candidates and parties are not only expensive, but so are groups outside. That leaves us wondering: if the $100 million is not going to political consultants, mailers and TV ads, what will it buy?

What about a giant bat in louisville? Downtown louisville is the official bat of major league baseball. Further decompose, each player in the main league can reach 1,777 bats.

“Most major league players experience about 10 dozen bats a year,” said rick redman, vice President of corporate communications with bat manufacturers.

That means $100 million will buy enough bats to support all major league baseball players for nearly 15 years.

“It’s more than twice the average professional baseball career, so it’s a lot of louisville bats, no doubt,” redman said.

$100 million will also be purchased:

Kentucky has 793 mid-priced homes.

2,222,000 tickets for the Kentucky wildcats game. That’s enough to fill the university’s rupu arena for nearly five seasons.

200 top racehorses.

“For $100 million, you can buy it put up for auction in September 2013 in the first Book 1 directory to sell 200 top horses,” Keeneland Association’s communications director Gregory Amy (Amy Gregory), said the company claimed to be the world’s largest auction thoroughbred. “Eighteen of them sold for $1 million or more, and the highest price paid $2.5 million for the war front pony.”

It will also buy a lot of bourbon.

“Think of it as Kentucky brown water,” said Bill Samuels Jr., chairman of the manufacturer Mark Distillery.

Samuels ran over math for us.

“If you take a bottle of Maker’s average selling prices across the country, that is $25, that means 4 million bottles, and our Kentucky’s slightly more than 4 million people, this is for everyone a bottle,” he said.

In fact, Maker’s Mark doesn’t have that much whiskey. The company has been experiencing a shortage in the past few years.

Finally, $100 million will end the budget gap for the coming year.

“It’s really remarkable, especially in a poor state,” said Sam Youngman, the leader’s political correspondent for the Lexington herald. “In the state of Frankfurt, they face a budget shortfall of $90 million, and you have to wonder where our currency priorities are.”

But he quickly pointed out that it was difficult for big political consumers like the Koch brothers or the environmentalist billionaire Tom stier to seek to help the country increase its budget shortfall.

“I think they already have a bigger game,” Youngman says.

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